Beginners Course Tip

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Surge Media Surge Media 1 year, 8 months ago.

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  • #8782
    Surge Media
    Surge Media
    Keymaster

    Great idea Laura!

    #8771

    Laura Ginnan
    Participant

    I really like the idea of getting people to move around and interact and think that it produces a better environment and eases the transition to supervised/duplicate.

    I haven’t run a full course myself but have done plenty in the way of assisting throughout a entire courses, running “Crash Courses” and running sessions for various stages of beginners.

    During the first lesson or 2 there can be a large discrepancy in the skill levels. Some people have never played trick taking games through to others who are in their 3rd or 4th course and the in between 500 players who have to get the ideas of 500 out of their heads! After a couple of lessons they gap lessens.

    When I run Crash Courses I number the tables and get people with very little experience to sit at table one and people with more experience to sit at higher numbered tables (dependent on attendees). People who haven’t played trick games are fine letting me know and will know that they will get the attention they need and players that have been to courses or played previously are flattered to find out that they are more experienced.

    This allows me to identify players that will need more help in the early stages and also groups players so that they don’t feel out of their comfort zone. The more experienced players get through more hands and the less experienced players aren’t rushed, get the attention that they need, aren’t “taught” (confused) by other more experienced learners and feel like they are in a safe environment.

    I think that they should move (and score) but I think I would apply the “self grading” system for the first lesson or two.

    #8762
    joaneb
    joaneb
    Participant

    I’ve found if you suggest that beginners change seats (and leave it up to them to do it randomly), they won’t, because their seat and the people at their table, are the only things they know at first, and therefore a bit of security for them(!).
    But, if, as Will suggests, the moves are organised by the teacher, then the decision is taken out of their hands. And Will is finding it works really well. If you try it, just keep student safety in mind.

    #8761
    joaneb
    joaneb
    Participant

    Great idea. Thanks Will. This would work best if people came to learn with their partners? So that the move is with their partner? I wonder sometimes how to help the “singles” who might get stuck with a person they may not gel with.
    Any suggestions of how your moving plan might help them too? i.e. that they can find a different partner when they move?

    #8759
    will
    will
    Participant

    One topic that cropped up at the Teachers Get Together in Canberra was how Beginners Courses should be introduced.
    A theme that all the experienced and successful teachers put across was to make the lessons fun, non-threatening and keep the mood of the room light.
    After teaching beginners for a few years, I stumbled across the idea to move beginners around (duplicate style) right from lesson 1. This prepares them for the ultimate goal of playing duplicate immediately, but it also has the goal of making the course more social. Everyone meets quite a few other people every week.
    If you run 4 boards (typical) then I recommend playing one hand, discuss, and then move EW up one table (don’t bother with table numbers) and stress that they need to introduce themselves as they arrive.
    Play Board 2 then move again.
    after 4 boards EW have possibly met one partner, and 8 opponents.
    If that amount of moving is too slow, then maybe play 2 boards, move, 2 boards.

    The benefits that I have found are mostly social, everyone meets more people, and are willing to swap partners if someone is away, and they chat more in the tea break. Down the track, I think they slot into supervised Duplicate bridge quite easily.

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